Sushi Switch

Sushi Switch

This city is forever in a state of change. Take my regular obsession with sushi this past summer, for example. I spent most of those balmy weekdays happily walking the 6 or so blocks to Sushi Shop, a hip, smart and spotlessly clean eat-in or take-out Japanese joint, whose impressive, sleek black packaging and boxy paper to-go bags were no doubt part of the allure. Imagine my surprise, when, a few days ago, driving by in a cab, I noticed Sushi Shop was gone and replaced by Sushiro, the largest chain of sushi restaurants in Japan. Curiosity aroused, I decided to go back and see if the new eatery was as worthwhile as the old. The actual space hadn't changed much: the space is divided into a simple, modern dining area on one side, and, on the other, walls filled with a variety of sushi and Japanese to-go dishes and cashier stations. Some options are gone: the sushi lunch I always opted for included a simple green salad with a remarkable ginger dressing: the new sushi packages offer edamame or a small side of kale, but not enough greens to define what I consider a real side salad. The pluses, though, compared to Sushi Shop, are notable: Sushiro offers beer, sake and wine; interesting sides like miso-glazed Brussels sprouts with bacon and pea leaves; and choices that Sushi Shop did not have, such as noodle bowls and grain bowls, the latter of which can be customized by grain (white or brown rice, quinoa or barley); sauces; and protein or veggie mains.

So, the final verdict? Despite my feeling the loss of those yummy greens, Sushiro still fits the bill. Forever changing, and forever offering new choices!

» Sushiro, 323 Park Ave. So., no phone