History in the Palm of Your Hand at Stack’s Bowers Galleries

History in the Palm of Your Hand at Stack’s Bowers Galleries

Yesterday afternoon, I took a trip to Midtown West to check out Stack’s Bowers Galleries—one of America’s leading auction firms, which specializes in consignment, appraisal and wholesale trade of U.S. coins, U.S. currency, world coins and ancient coins. Since the 1930s, this has been the place for anyone and everyone interested in art, history and, of course, numismatics—from serious collectors looking for that rare find, to investors searching for a sound purchase, to customers looking for the perfect Christmas gift for their history buff dad, and kids starting their very own coin collections. Stack’s Bowers’ items, which can be described as historic works of art, not only cross all geographical categories and time periods but also price points. In 2013, for example, Stack’s Bowers sold a 1794 silver dollar for $10 million—on the flip side, a customer can purchase a coin dating back to Biblical times for less than $100.

Currently, the team at Stack’s Bowers Galleries is gearing up for the Whitman Coin and Collectibles Spring Expo, to be held March 26 thru 29 in Baltimore. Although the gallery typically deals in silver dollars, nickels, quarters, historic paper currency and the like, I got a chance to view three large medals it will bring to auction at the event (March 27), including the 1936 Nobel Peace Prize given to Argentina’s Foreign Minister Carlos Saavedra Lamas—the first time a person from Latin America received this prestigious honor; as well as the 1932 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, designed by renowned sculptor Daniel Chester French and given to the New York World-Telegram (1931-1966); and a 1789 silver medal known as the “Washington  Before Boston” medal, which was given to VIPs and important institutions—a precious object most likely held by Thomas Jefferson.

Next time you’re digging through your pockets looking for change, stop and take a look at what’s in the palm of your hand. You might be holding on to something valuable—and the folks at Stack’s Bowers Galleries are there to help you find out.

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