Sen Sakana Brings Nikkei to New York

Sen Sakana Brings Nikkei to New York

The team behind Sen Sakana—the 190-seat Japanese-Peruvian hub for Nikkei-style grub in-the-making since 2014—opened its doors to the public on Wednesday, July 26. The restaurant’s pre-opening party on Monday, July 24 showcased the $7 million invested into renovating the space, which now includes an expansive main dining room, an elevated sushi bar with eleven seats as well as surrounding tables, a private dining room, and a 12-seat cocktail bar. Besides tastes from the kitchen and samplings of the new resto's wine and sake list, the party also featured a celebratory performance (pictured below)

(Courtesy Sen Sakana)


Chef Mina Newman (Christos Steakhouse, Edison Ballroom) and Chef Taku Nagai (Ootoya) have compiled an ambitious menu divided into nine categories of Nikkei-style cuisine, offering well over 50 items. 

Nikkei cuisine, brought to fruition in the 1850’s by Japanese immigrants who relocated to Peru, fuses Peruvian ingredients and recipes with the flavors and influences of Japanese cooking to form “an intense cultural exchange,” as detailed by the chefs within the opening pages of the kitchen team’s elaborate menu. Both of these extremely rich food cultures come together at Sen Sakana—which means “one thousand fish” in Japanese, a tribute to the 1,000 different species of fish said to swim in the waters off Peru. 

The restaurant’s unique take on Nigiri (sliced raw fish served over press vinegared rice) can be seen in the salmon nigiri, which is served with beets, gooseberry and shiso. Depths of both cultures are covered, as simple sashimi items are complemented by offerings of salchipappas and yucca queso croquettes. Offerings of makimono—which literally means “rolled thing”—includes rolls devoted to places in Peru; the Andes Yama is made up snow crab, asparagus oshinko, shiso maki, and is topped with salmon, beets, goose berry and chive. The Lima Futo is made of snow crab, tamago, oboro and assorted vegetables. 

(Courtesy Sen Sakana)


            Realistically, it would take a feast of the extended family proportion to come close to tackling this food menu. Luckily, the restaurant’s vast size makes it dependably reliable to get a seat; its minimalist design and subtle blond wood provide it soothing ambience and its immediate availability for the Midtown lunch crowd gives locals and visitors all the more reason to check out New York’s brand-spanking-new Nikkei experience sooner than later.

 

>> Sen Sakana, 28 W. 44th St., 212.221.9561. No Website.

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