We Must Remember So We Never Forget

We Must Remember So We Never Forget

On September 11, 2001, I was a senior in high school. This particular Tuesday morning started off like any other—except I was anxious about my senior class trip to Canada, which was to take place the following day. At approximately 8:46 a.m., I was sitting in first period Yearbook Staff. Several of my fellow seniors were in the class, and we eagerly engaged in conversation about what we packed for the trip, what restaurants we should try, etc. All of a sudden, our normally talkative teacher got a phone call and all we heard was a loud, uncharacteristic gasp escape from his mouth. All conversation ceased. He turned on the TV, and we learned what happened—and at that second, nothing else seemed to matter. Everyone can recount with vivid detail where they were that fateful day. And, although it’s painful to remember, we must never forget. Today marks 11 years since the September 11th attacks, and several memorials and ceremonies are being held throughout the city. At The 9/11 Tribute Center, stories of 9/11 are told by those who were there—family members, survivors, lower Manhattan residents, recovery workers and volunteers. Walking tours are available to the 9/11 Memorial, which has two large reflecting pools and a series of trees planted on the site. It’s remembering the past that gives us the power not to repeat it.

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