One Man’s Passion Makes for an Impressive Museum

One Man’s Passion Makes for an Impressive Museum

Early 20th-century American industrialist Henry Clay Frick loved art. In fact, I don’t think it would be out of line to suggest Frick really, really loved art—so much so that he started an impressive collection in his Upper East Side home, which you can still view today.

The Frick Collection, housed on the first floor of a sprawling mansion designed by Thomas Hastings, of Carrère and Hastings fame, is an assortment of works that span a number of art movements, years and disciplines. Walking the many galleries, art-lovers are treated to up-close glances at some of the most celebrated masterpieces in art history—from Impressionist watercolors in substantial ornate frames (works of art in themselves), like Claude Monet’s Vétheuil in Winter and Edgar Degas’ The Rehearsal to stately portraits, including Northern Renaissance painter Hans Holbein The Younger’s famed depiction of King Henry VIII’s chief minister Thomas Cromwell. Within the expansive galleries—which could even rival today’s most expansive apartments in terms of square footage—visitors will also find 18th-century French furniture, Limoges enamel, Oriental rugs, decorative art and bookshelves teeming with leather-bound titles. Although you can’t take photos in most of the museum, you won’t be disappointed with the Kodak moment-worthy photo opts granted in the museum’s tranquil Garden Court (pictured). For more information, click here.

 

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